Morse Felt Studio makes wool felt

Posted by on Mar 21, 2013 in Video Blog | No Comments

 


 
Atelier de feutre artisanal from Morse Felt Studio on Vimeo

Based in La Mulatiere, near Lyon in the centre of France, Morse Felt is a two heads for hands textile studio specialised in artisanal wool felt. In collaboration with design agencies, architect practices and set designers, Elisabeth Berthon and Chloé Lecoup produce unique, limited editions and bespoke creations.

In addition to being and excellent insulator, felt has many qualities valued today; it is renewable, biodegradable, anti-static, non-allergenic, self-extinguishing, controls humidity and absorbs pollutants. Elisabeth and Chloé feel its huge potential has not yet been fully realised. However, its various qualities place it at the heart of debate about the contemporary habitat.

The Morse Felt Studio website explains: Artisanal wool felt is not boiled wool, it is not baize and it is not industrial felt. This nonwoven cloth is made from natural animal fibres which form indissoluble and irreversible bonds during the production process.

In fact  FELT = WOOL + HOT WATER + TRADITIONAL SOAP + MANIPULATION + TIME

The result can greatly vary in thickness, opacity and handle with the fibre and techniques used. Morse Felt is able to create felt as sheer and light as silk organza.

There are in fact three felting techniques: wet felting, needle felting and carroting. The technique used by Elisabeth and Chloé is wet felting. Wool hair is naturally kinked and made up of unidirectional scales. Vegetal soap melts its Keratin helping the wool fibre to bond through little “tacking” stitches created by the friction of the wet felting process.

Courses and workshops in this technique are run in La Mulatiere.

 


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