Norwich Front

Be down-to-earth at Norwich University of the Arts

 

At Norwich University of Arts, the BA Fashion course aims at developing the creative and cultural sides of their students. For GFW 2015, Norwich’s fashion students showed a sophisticated love of the natural world through earthy colours, natural fabrics and organic patterns. This resulted in a harmony between the collections. This year’s show resonated with their 2014 show in the way students treated the silhouette. Interesting cuts and fabrics were highlighted with a broader colour palette to create eye-catching outfits.
Yu Miao opened the show, setting the nature inspired tone. Looking at her portfolio, we understand the collection was made to be directly in accordance with nature.

All Images by Alexandra Cryle

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Trees are brought to mind by the effective use of stripes, and the colours speak of the ground the bare foot is meant to touch. This might explain the open shoes. Yu’s skills in construction and the use of wool and cotton as material strengthen the connection to nature.

Selected for the GFW 2015 Accessories Award and the Innovation Award, Naomi Cunningham’s collection had a distinctive approach to everyday wear. The collection featured a few outfits with bags integrated into the actual garment. Either on the side or on the back (less practical), the issue of accessorizing can disappear with Naomi’s designs!

Sami Hogg designed her ‘Am I being tricked?’ collection around a concept, mental illness, treated both from a sociological and personal perspective.

She illustrated this through her choice of colourful garments and prints, which illustrated the possible chaos that can happen in one’s head.


 

Her profile on artsthread.com explains how her constructions suggest that ‘we should look beneath the layers’, thus explaining the visibility of the seams. The designer kept the same colour variation in the shoes, completing the collection.

Victoria Miller spiced up the show by creating a vibrant red and pink collection, maintaining harmony with the rest through silhouettes. The idea of reversibility in one garment added a dimension to the collections. The appearance of cuts and seams depicts an interest in the process of fashion. Moreover, her (literally) cropped tops amplified the understanding of how a fashionable garment is realized, by intentionally leaving the sewing threads visible.

Caitlin Seale’s childrenswear collection also illustrated the organic theme.

She used mixed natural prints on delicate silks, gently cut a leather skirt, with cotton in all her outfits.


 

The quite girlish outfits underlined the idea of childhood, and how precious this time is. The children’s lively performance in flowing dresses perked the mood of the audience.

Laura Rose Samson presented dark garments, with touches of white and beige meant to remind us of the night-time atmosphere. The primal patterns of the collection evoked the idea of the human origins. She also illustrated simplicity with long sleeves and silhouettes throughout her collection. The designer created a nicely put-together harmonious yet primal collection.

The overall Norwich University of Arts produced a balanced show at GFW 2015, where colour palettes and theme often referred back to nature. The recurring long silhouettes in woollen material evoked the middle age and an appreciation for simplicity and truth.


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Written by Nerys d’Esclercs

Nerys d'Esclercs

Of both French and British nationalities, I grew up in a multi-cultural environment, which probably explain my love to write about subcultures.

After one year of Fashion Styling at the Istituto Marangoni, I decided to move to the London College of Fashion and focus more on writing. The MA Fashion Media Practice and Criticism I joined had an openness I was interested in. I feel that my love for writing and sociology is being developed there. The course helps me understand why things happen a certain way, and how people came to think like this in fashion.
I aspire to become a fashion journalist at the New York Times and be a researcher in a university. A big ambition, which I have always had, that will lead all of my experiences.

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