All in Forms



Massayuki Ito’s degree collection All in Forms, is beautiful. It is charming and elegant, but do not be fooled by its quiet assurance, it is as innovative and creative as any other presented May the 3rd, at the Academy of Art University  2012 Spring Fashion Show.



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Massayuki Ito’s degree collection All in Forms, is beautiful. It is charming and elegant, but do not be fooled by its quiet assurance, it is as innovative and creative as any other presented May the 3rd, at the Academy of Art University  2012 Spring Fashion Show.

Massayuki not only found innovative ways to produce is own material by recycling vintage pieces, he was also inspired by his own version of gender bending.
Massayuki, also known as Massa, grew up in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where he graduated in 2005 with an Arts Degree in Interior Design from the Estacio de Sa University. He moved to San Francisco in 2007, and later enrolled at the Academy of Art University to pursue a B.F.A. in Fashion Design. Earlier this year, his work earned him a scholarship from the YMA Fashion Scholarship Fund.

Massa, can you explain your collection in a few words?
My collection favors harmony and proportion. It combines intricate shapes, silhouettes and textures into a cool, chic and contemporary look that shows the confidence of the modern women.

What was your purpose with this collection?
I wanted to play with different shapes and silhouettes and achieve a different result in each of my looks. The idea was also to combine different fabrics in every garment along with pleats and folds. This collection is an expression of my identity as a first generation Japanese Brazilian.

What fabrics did you use?
I used a combination of vintage Japanese kimono fabrics, silk brocades, raw silk, fabric made from bamboo, and linen. I believe that the strength of my collection is in the combination of structure and draping, but also in the way I used fabrics, creating my own by combining several different material and using embroidery.



You said that this collection is an expression of your identity as a first generation Japanese Brazilian. How is it so?
I revisited my heritage for this collection because I thought it would be a great way to make this collection really personal. I was inspired by the angular silhouettes found in traditional Japanese menswear and armor.

So you used traditional men’s silhouette to design women’s wear. How did you design your silhouettes?
I would first sketch my looks but then develop the garments directly on the dress form (mannequin, in the UK). I believe that working in 3D was very significant in the design process because it enabled me to work on the drapes and folds of my garments.

Was there an aspect particularly difficult in the creation of your collection?
Working and designing a collection with one of kind vintage fabrics was really challenging because of the quantity limitation. I knew that if I made a mistake or damage some of my stock I wouldn’t be able to source it again.

What do you feel you have learned through the experience of creating your collection?
I realised that I was a perfectionist. I was always trying to make my garments better. The more I would work on them the more they would need work! It is a little maddening but I realised that my creativity would come through when I was really focused working on my garments.

What do you think is important for a designer to succeed?
Everyone is different but the advice that I would give is to keep yourself always inspired and to research as much as you can.

I believe you are now looking for an internship working with a fashion designer. Would you consider doing anything else than fashion design?
I just love it and I could do this for the rest of my life. I can’t really see myself doing anything else!
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